Wootility - Configuring device access for Wootility under Linux (udev rules)

Background

Because the Wootility communicates directly with the keyboard the user needs the permission for it, otherwise the keyboard can't be found. So either the Wootility must be started with higher privileges (like with sudo) or the user need the permission for accessing the device.

Granting access with udev

To granting the user for accessing the Wooting keyboard without the need to run it with higher privileges, the access rights must be set for the device. This can be done with dedicated udev rules there a named group get authorised to the device. So the user needs to be in that group in order to grant him access to the device with the Wootility. It's recommended to use the standard group 'input' for this, but you can use any existing group to limit the access to them.

Creating the rules

Create a new file called 'wooting.rules' under the path '/etc/udev/rules.d/' with the following content. The name can be changed, but the file extension must be 'rules' otherwise it wont work.

'/etc/udev/rules.d/wooting.rules'
# Wooting One  
SUBSYSTEM=="hidraw", ATTRS{idVendor}=="03eb", ATTRS{idProduct}=="ff01", MODE:="0660", GROUP="input"
# Wooting One update mode 
SUBSYSTEM=="hidraw", ATTRS{idVendor}=="03eb", ATTRS{idProduct}=="2402", MODE:="0660", GROUP="input"

# Wooting Two 
SUBSYSTEM=="hidraw", ATTRS{idVendor}=="03eb", ATTRS{idProduct}=="ff02", MODE:="0660", GROUP="input"
# Wooting Two update mode  
SUBSYSTEM=="hidraw", ATTRS{idVendor}=="03eb", ATTRS{idProduct}=="2403", MODE:="0660", GROUP="input"
	

This rules will provide every users in the group 'input' the access to the current Wooting devices with the Wootility.

Applying the new rules

To activate the rules they must be loaded and applied by the following command:
sudo udevadm control --reload-rules && sudo udevadm trigger
	

Ensuring that the desired users are in the granted group

Only the users in the granted group of the rules have access to the device. So ensure that the group already exists and that the desired users are in it. Command to check if the group exists and to show its members:
cat /etc/group | grep input
		
If the command don't list the group as an output than it don't exist yet and you must create it. Command to create the group:
sudo groupadd input
		

If the group exists but the users aren't listed in that, then you must add them to it.

Command to add the user 'TESTUSER' to the group:

sudo usermod -a -G input TESTUSER
		

After the user was added to that group it can be that he is still not listed in it, if so it's necessary to logout the user or even to reboot the entire system in some cases in order to apply the changes.

Different distributions can use different commands and tools, you need to check if the mentioned system inputs are supported by your distribution.

Thanks to Rocky_4 (DEU) on Discord for the solution.

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